Bioarchaeology Research Laboratory (BARL)

BARL Associated Faculty

Research Activities

La Florida Bioarchaeology Project

The La Florida Bioarchaeology Project is a large, interdisciplinary research program focused on the study of the health and lifestyle impacts of colonization and agricultural intensification on native populations living in the region of the American Southeast controlled by Spain during the 16th, 17th, and early 18th centuries.  This 40-year, collaborative project focusses on health and lifestyle in temporal and regional perspective, tracking population dynamics both before and after the arrival of Europeans and the establishment of missions and towns on the Georgia coast and northern Florida.

Selected Publications:

Clark Spencer Larsen (editor) (2001)  Bioarchaeology of Spanish Florida: the Impact of Colonialism.  University Press of Florida, Gainesville.  324 pp.

Clark Spencer Larsen (editor)  (1990)  The Archaeology of Mission Santa Catalina de Guale: 2. Biocultural Interpretations of a Population in Transition.  Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History No. 68.  150 pp.

Clark Spencer Larsen, Mark C. Griffin, Dale L. Hutchinson, Vivian E. Noble, Lynette Norr, Robert F. Pastor, Christopher B. Ruff, Katherine F. Russell, Margaret J. Schoeninger, Michael Schultz, Scott W. Simpson, and Mark F. Teaford  (2001)  Frontiers of Contact: Bioarchaeology of Spanish Florida.  Journal of World Prehistory 15:69-123.

Dale L. Hutchinson, Clark Spencer Larsen, Margaret J. Schoeninger, and Lynette Norr  (1998)  Regional Variation in the Pattern of Maize Adoption and Use in Florida and Georgia.  American Antiquity 63:397-416.

Clark Spencer Larsen, Dale L. Hutchinson, Christopher M. Stojanowski, Matthew A. Williamson, Mark C. Griffin, Scott W. Simpson, Christopher B. Ruff, Margaret J. Schoeninger, Lynette Norr, Mark F. Teaford, Elizabeth Monahan Driscoll, Christopher W. Schmidt, and Tiffiny A. Tung  (2007)  Health and Lifestyle in Georgia and Florida: Agricultural Origins and Intensification in Regional Perspective. In: Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification, edited by Mark N. Cohen and Gillian Crane-Kramer, pp. 20-34.  University Press of Florida, Gainesville.

Lauren A. Winkler, Clark Spencer Larsen, Victor D. Thompson, Paul W. Sciulli, Dale L. Hutchinson, David Hurst Thomas, Elliot H. Blair, and Matthew C. Sanger  (in press)  The Social Structuring of Stress in Contact-Era Spanish Florida: A Bioarchaeological Case Study from Mission Santa Catalina de Guale, St. Catherines Island, Georgia.  In: Bioarchaeology of Contact, Colonial Encounters, and Colonialism: Global Visions and New Approaches from Studies of Human Skeletons, edited by Melissa S. Murphy and Haagen Klaus.  University Press of Florida, Gainesville.  (in press)

Principal Investigator:

  • Clark Spencer Larsen, Ohio State University

Collaborators:

  • Mark C. Griffin, San Francisco State University
  • Dale L. Hutchinson, University of North Carolina
  • Robert F. Pastor, University of Bradford
  • Christopher B. Ruff, John Hopkins University
  • Katherine F. Russell
  • Margaret J. Schoeninger, University of California, San Diego
  • Michael Schultz, University of Göttingen
  • Scott W. Simpson, Case Western Reserve University
  • Mark F. Teaford, Johns Hopkins University

Bioarchaeology of Çatalhöyük Project

Çatalhöyük provides a window on to early farmers and adaptation of early Holocene humans in south-central Turkey dating to 7100-5950 cal BC.  Central to understanding the successes and failures of populations inhabiting this setting is the study of human remains.  Since 2002, a team of bioarchaeologists has been addressing the larger question: What were the implications of domestication and agricultural intensification, increasing sedentism, and population growth for health and lifestyle in this early farming community?  The investigation is an arm of the larger Çatalhöyük Archaeological Project, directed by Ian Hodder.

Publications:

Joshua W. Sadvari, Michael Charles, Christopher B. Ruff, Tristan Carter, Milena Vasić, Clark Spencer Larsen, Daniella E. Bar-Yosef Mayer, and Chris Doherty  (2015)  The People and Their Landscape(s): Changing Mobility Patterns at Neolithic Çatalhöyük.  In: Assembling Çatalhöyük, European Association of Archaeologists, edited by Arek Marciniak and Ian Hodder.  (in press)

Marin A. Pilloud, Scott D. Haddow, Christopher J. Knüsel, and Clark Spencer Larsen, A Bioarchaeological and Forensic Re-Assessment of Vulture Defleshing and Mortuary Practices at Neolithic Çatalhöyük.  Journal of Archaeological Science, in press.

Jessica Pearson, Amy Bogaard, Michael Charles, Katheryn Twiss, Nerissa Russell, Clark Spencer Larsen, and Simon Hillson  (2015)   Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis at Neolithic Çatalhöyük: Evidence for Human and Animal Diet and the Relationship to Households.  Journal of Archaeological Science 57:69-79.

Jessica Pearson, Scott D. Haddow, Christopher J. Knüsel, Clark Spencer Larsen, and Joshua W. Sadvari   (2015)  Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis and Dietary Reconstruction through the Life Course at Neolithic Çatalhöyük, Turkey.  Journal of Social Archaeology 15:210-232.

Clark Spencer Larsen, Simon W. Hillson, Basak Boz, Marin A. Pilloud, Joshua W. Sadvari, Sabrina C. Agarwal, Bonnie Glencross, Patrick Beauchesne, Jessica Pearson, Christopher B. Ruff, Evan M. Garofalo, Lori D. Hager, Scott D. Haddow, and Christopher J. Knüsel  (2015)   Bioarchaeology of Neolithic Çatalhöyük: Lives and Lifestyles of an Early Farming Society in Transition.  Journal of World Prehistory 28:27-68.

John L. Brooke and Clark Spencer Larsen  (2014)   The Nurture of Nature: Genetics, Epigenetics, and Environment in Human Biohistory.  In: Roundtable Forum on History and Biology, edited by Randolph Roth.  American Historical Review 119:1500-1513.

Principal Investigators:

  • Clark Spencer Larsen, Ohio State University; Christopher J. Knüsel, University of Bordeaux

Collaborators:

  • Simon Hillson, University College London
  • Basak Boz, T.R. Trakya University
  • Marin Pilloud, University of Nevada, Reno
  • Ian Hodder, Stanford University
  • Christopher B. Ruff, John Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Joshua Sadvari, Ohio State University
  • Sabrina Agarwal, University of California, Berkeley
  • Bonnie Glencross, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Patrick Beauchesne, University of Michigan, Dearborn
  • Jessica Pearson, University of Liverpool
  • Evan M. Garofalo, University of Maryland School of Medicine
  • Scott D. Haddow, Stanford University
  • Marco Milella, University of Zurich
  • Mehmet Somel, Middle East Technical University, Ankara
  • Fusun Ozer, Middle East Technical University, Ankara
  • Christina Warinner, University of Oklahoma

Badia Pozzeveri Bioarchaeological and Archaeological Project

The Badia Pozzeveri Bioarchaeological and Archaeological Project, both a research program and annual field school held near Lucca in province of Tuscany, Italy, is a collaboration between Ohio State University and the University of Pisa.  The project is focussed on the excavation and study of a church and its cemetery dating from ca. AD 1000 to the abandonment of the church in the 1960s.  The church, San Pietro a Pozzeveri, saw periods of decline, stasis, and prosperity, peaking in importance as a religious and administrative center when it served as an important monastery in the region from AD 1056 to AD 1408.  In addition to church personnel, the cemetery served as the burial for the local town and surrounding farms.  As such, it represents an undisturbed record of human biology and social context for one thousand years of history in northern Italy.  The project is focussing on the understanding of health and lifestyle.  Specific periods of stress and decline are well known in the region, especially the 1855 cholera epidemic that killed hundreds in this community and many thousands in Tuscany.  In addition to osteological studies, we are working on finding and documenting the DNA of the bacteria that causes cholera, Vibrio cholera.

http://spark.sciencemag.org/the-thousand-year-graveyard/

Co-Principal Investigators:

  • Clark Spencer Larsen, Ohio State University
  • Gino Fornaciari, University of Pisa
  • Giuseppe Vercellotti, Ohio State University

Collaborators:

  • Antonio Fornaciari, University of Pisa
  • Francesco Coschino, University of Florence
  • Hendrik Poinar, McMaster University

Global History of Health Project

The Global Hisotry of health Project, co-directed by Richard Steckel, Clark Larsen, and Philip Walker, and working with collaborators throughout Europe, is a project involving numerous physical anthropologists, geographers, medical historians, historians, economists, economic historians, archaeologists, and climatologists focusing on the documentation and interpretation of the history of human health over the last 10,000 years. The project grew out of the History of Health and Nutrition in the Western Hemisphere, directed by Richard Steckel and Jerome Rose. The global project currently focuses on the history of health in Europe.

Co-Principal Investigators:

  • Richard H. Steckel, Ohio State University
  • Clark Spencer Larsen, Ohio State University
  • Kimberly D. Williams, Temple University
  • Charlotte Roberts, Durham University

Collaborators:

  • Joel Blondiaux, Centre d'Etudes Paleopathologiques du Nord
  • Miguel C. Botella, University of Granada
  • John Brooke, Ohio State University
  • Yuri K. Chistov, Museum of Anthropology & Ethnography, St. Petersburg
  • Alfredo Coppa, University of Rome
  • Eugénia Cunha, University of Coimbra
  • Ebba During, Stockholm University
  • Paul Evans, Ohio State University
  • Brian Fagan, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gisela Grupe, University of Munich
  • Michael Haines, Colgate University
  • Barbara Hanawalt, Ohio State University
  • Henrik Jarl Hansen, National Museum of Denmark
  • Per Holck, University of Oslo
  • Rimantas Jankauskas, Vilnius University
  • George Maat, University of Leiden
  • Antónia Marcsik, University of Szeged
  • Ellen Mosley-Thompson, Ohio State University
  • Astrid E. J. Ogilvie, University of Colorado
  • Luiz Oosterbeek, Instituto Politécnico de Tomar
  • Anastasia Papathanasiou, Greek Ministry of Culture
  • Geoffrey Parker, Ohio State University
  • Christian Pfister, University of Bern
  • Inna Potiekhina, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine
  • Charlotte Roberts, University of Durham
  • Randy Roth, Ohio State University
  • Michael Schultz, University of Göttingen
  • Maria Teschler-Nicola, Natural History Museum, Vienna
  • Lonnie Thompson, Ohio State University

 

Trabecular Bone and Locomotor Ontogeny Project

The TBLO project is a National Science Foundation-funded collaborative effort including researchers from Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, and University of Arizona. The focus is on documenting and interpreting the patterns of skeletal developmental morphology (cortical and trabecular) as linked to locomotor kinematic data in modern humans and non-human primates. Visualization and quantification of high resolution microCT imaging data of skeletal elements are the cornerstones of this ongoing project.

Publications:

J.H. Gosman, D.A. Raichlen, and T.M. Ryan (2015) Human ransitions: current perspectives on skeletal development. In Agarwal, SC and Beauchesne, PD (eds). Children and Childhood in the Past. University Press of Florida.

D.A. Raichlen, A.D. Gordon, R.S. Scott, J. Webber, A.D. Foster, S.M. Sukhdeo, J.H. Gosman, and T.M. Ryan (2015). An ontogenetic framework linking locomotion and trabecular bone architecture with applications for reconstructing hominin life history. Journal of Human Evolution 81: 1-12.

J.H. Gosman, Z.R. Hubbell, C.N. Shaw, and T.M. Ryan (2013) Development of cortical bone geometry in the human femoral and tibial diaphysis. Anatomical Record 296:774-787.

J.H. Gosman, S.D. Stout, and C.S. Larsen  (2011)  Skeletal biology over the life span: a view from the surfaces. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 53:86-98.

J.H. Gosman, and R.A. Ketcham (2009)  Patterns in Ontogeny of Human Trabecular Bone from SunWatch Village in the Prehistoric Ohio Valley: General Features of Microarchitectural Change. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 138: 318-332.

Principal Investigators:

  • James H. Gosman, Ohio State University
  • David A.  Raichlen, University of Arizona
  • Timothy M. Ryan, Penn State University

Collaborators:

  • Adam D. Gordon, University of Albany
  • Adam D. Foster, University of Arizona
  • James T. Webber, University of Arizona
  • Simone M. Sukhdeo, Penn State University
  • Robert S. Scott, Rutgers University
  • Bernadette Perchalski, Penn State University
  • Arielle Placke, Penn State University
  • Colin Shaw, University of Cambridge
  • Zachariah Hubbell, Ohio State University

BARL Ph.D. Graduates

Heather Edgar 2002 Associate Professor, University of New Mexico
Loren Lease 2003 Associate Professor, Youngstown State University
Kimberly Williams 2005 Associate Professor, Temple University
Daniel Temple 2007 Assistant Professor, George Mason University
Tracy Betsinger 2007 Associate Professor, State University of New York, College at Oneonta
James H Gosman 2007 Private Practice, Orthopaedic Surgery Adjunct Associate Professor Ohio State University
Haagen Klaus 2008 Associate Professor, George Mason University
Deborrah Pinto 2009 Forensic Anthropologist, Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences
Brian Scott Aubry 2009 Lecturer, Ohio State University- Newark
Robin Feeney 2009 Assistant Professor, University College Dublin
Marin Pilloud 2009 Assistant Professor, University of Nevada
Joshua Peck 2009 Forensic Scientist, Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii
Jaime Ullinger 2010 Assistant Professor, Quinnipiac University
Jules Angel 2010 Lecturer, The Ohio State University
Joyce Chan 2011 Assistant Professor, California State University, Dominguez Hills
Amanda Agnew 2011 Assistant Professor, Wright State University
Heather Jarrellc2011 Lecturer, University of California, Merced
Leslie Gregoricka 2011 Assistant Professor, University of South Alabama
Stephen Schlecht 2012 Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Michigan School of Medicine
Britney Kyle 2012 Assistant Professor, Northern Colorado University
Laurie Reitsema 2012 Assistant Professor, University of Georgia
Amy Hubbard 2012 Assistant Professor, Wright State University
Corey Maggiano 2012 Assistant Professor, University of West Georgia
Megan Ingvoldstadt 2012 Forensic Anthropologist, Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii
Pedro da Gloria 2012 Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Sao Paolo
Giuseppe Vercellotti 2012 Adjunct Professor, The Ohio State University; President, Piezosurgery Inc.
Samantha Blatt 2013 Visiting Assistant Professor, Boise State University
Sarah Martin 2013 Assistant Professor, Spokane Falls Community College
Lara McCormick 2013 Visiting Assistant Professor, University of West Georgia
Leslie Williams 2013 Assistant Professor, Beloit College
Michaela Huffman 2014 Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley
Timothy Gocha 2014 Postdoctoral Fellow, Texas State University
Adam Kolatorowicz 2015 Assistant Professor, Lincoln Memorial University, Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine
Randee Hunter 2015 Clinical Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University College of Medicine

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